This table saw was completely redesigned and heavily improved in both safety measures and cutting capacity. For safety, DeWalt redesigned the red power switch to be electronic. It automatically resets the saw to turn off if the power is interrupted whatever the cause. I’ve heard some job-site horror stories regarding table saws who weren’t turned off properly so this redesign was very much needed.
I am looking at getting a saw, and this has helped, but still leaves a lot of confusion. most of my work would be diy projects, maybe shelving, who really know. The main reason for buying one, is I am looking to build some SUP’s. (Stand Up Paddle boards) I will be ripping 10-12′ 1/4″ strips that maybe in the 3/8″ up to 3″ range, along with re-sawing some wider planks into the 1/4″ thick, 5-6″ wide plank’s. I have been going back and forth on the Dewalt dwe7491rs vs the Delta 36-725t2 vs the comparable Ridgid. Any thoughts? the Dewalt would be nice as it packs away in a smaller space, but the delta/ridgid would also be easily moved out of the way. with the Dewalt, I would probably end up making an outfeed bench. price points they are all similar, I am just not sure what would be the best for this type of work. thanks for any input.

If you’re working out of your garage, you may not have room for a full-size, standalone table saw. There are several tabletop models available that provide a smaller (and typically less expensive) alternative with the same wood-cutting capabilities. However, if you do have room for a full-size model, these are generally more versatile and powerful.

power dwe7491rs


Obviously, given its size, the TruePower 01-0819 isn’t the kind of table saw you’d spring for to take on larger projects that require greater motor power — after all, it’s by no means revolutionary in the torque department. But for those who work with smaller materials or softer wood, the Gino Development TruePower 01-0819 Mini Electric Table Saw is a worthwhile, no-frills buy that’s easy on the wallet and can fit in virtually any space with plenty of room to spare.

Best DeWalt Table Saw Reviews 2020 - Top Picks & Buyer's Guide


The DeWalt doesn’t go above and beyond here but has some standard safety equipment as part of its Site-Pro Guarding System. The Blade Guard Assembly is a standard clear plastic set of guards that allows the wood to be fed to the blade but shields you from putting hands on the exposed blade in a slip. The guards will lock in a raised position when you need to see the blade—for example, when adjusting the blade height—which lessens the temptation to remove this safety feature when it’s in your way.
The first step always has to be to make sure that you match a saw with your actual needs. It’s a pretty simple thing to go out and buy the biggest, angriest saw available and call it good. But your genuine needs might be modest enough that the biggest, angriest saw is also too much saw, which means that you’re just throwing away a bunch of money. The same goes for weight. If you’re a small-framed person who has difficulty lugging around heavy, bulky objects, you’ll want to tailor your saw to your frame. If you can’t use it, it’s the same thing as not owning it.
But here we can start to dream. DeWalt’s DCS7485B is a saw you can use basically anywhere. It’s cordless, so you don’t have to worry about outlets and extension cords (except to charge batteries). Because of that, it’s also more compact and lighter than most models that have a power cord. The trade-off is that the battery life is limited, especially compared to wall power. Even with DeWalt’s features to increase its cordless power, it’s still not quite there yet compared to corded drills. But again, for the work you require of it, this might be a perfect fit.
I tested both saws and found their performance similar, though thanks to the rolling stand, I was more likely to reach for the DeWalt. If you don’t value the stand, the SKILSAW packs a lot of power in a small form and is the preferred job site saw of several local contractors I know. If you’re a weekend warrior like me, you may value the stand enough to spend the extra money on the DeWalt.
The first step always has to be to make sure that you match a saw with your actual needs. It’s a pretty simple thing to go out and buy the biggest, angriest saw available and call it good. But your genuine needs might be modest enough that the biggest, angriest saw is also too much saw, which means that you’re just throwing away a bunch of money. The same goes for weight. If you’re a small-framed person who has difficulty lugging around heavy, bulky objects, you’ll want to tailor your saw to your frame. If you can’t use it, it’s the same thing as not owning it.

DWE7491RS

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