I am looking at getting a saw, and this has helped, but still leaves a lot of confusion. most of my work would be diy projects, maybe shelving, who really know. The main reason for buying one, is I am looking to build some SUP’s. (Stand Up Paddle boards) I will be ripping 10-12′ 1/4″ strips that maybe in the 3/8″ up to 3″ range, along with re-sawing some wider planks into the 1/4″ thick, 5-6″ wide plank’s. I have been going back and forth on the Dewalt dwe7491rs vs the Delta 36-725t2 vs the comparable Ridgid. Any thoughts? the Dewalt would be nice as it packs away in a smaller space, but the delta/ridgid would also be easily moved out of the way. with the Dewalt, I would probably end up making an outfeed bench. price points they are all similar, I am just not sure what would be the best for this type of work. thanks for any input.

box size dwe7491rs


It accommodates a clean workspace with its dust port that you can link to the external accessories to keep that messy dust away. The face is great, easy to set up, and in its category, it is the best fence. You can adjust it with accuracy and quickly use the pinion fence rail and the rack. The only complaint is perhaps the miter gauge, otherwise, DeWalt DW745 is the best table saw you could ever have.

dewalt dwe7491rs


If you’re working out of your garage, you may not have room for a full-size, standalone table saw. There are several tabletop models available that provide a smaller (and typically less expensive) alternative with the same wood-cutting capabilities. However, if you do have room for a full-size model, these are generally more versatile and powerful.

power dwe7491rs


Rip capacity is a jargony-sounding term that refers to the size of the piece you can cut. Bigger saws tend to—ta-da—have the ability to cut larger pieces of wood. This can be important because woodworking often involves using large pieces of wood used either in remodeling homes or building new additions. If you need the flexibility of handling large pieces of wood, you’ll want to give serious consideration to the rip capacity of the saws you’re looking at because it’ll come into play at some point.
First off, consider how often you’ll put your table saw to use. If you work in the fields of contracting or carpentry, there’s a chance you’ll be using your new machine pretty often—so you may as well invest in a more expensive, heavy-duty table saw that’s sure to last longer than the average model. On the other hand, hobbyists and weekend woodworkers won’t need a pricey piece of machinery—a more compact and inexpensive model should do just fine, especially if you’re only working on smaller projects like birdhouses and DIY wooden models.
The first step always has to be to make sure that you match a saw with your actual needs. It’s a pretty simple thing to go out and buy the biggest, angriest saw available and call it good. But your genuine needs might be modest enough that the biggest, angriest saw is also too much saw, which means that you’re just throwing away a bunch of money. The same goes for weight. If you’re a small-framed person who has difficulty lugging around heavy, bulky objects, you’ll want to tailor your saw to your frame. If you can’t use it, it’s the same thing as not owning it.

DWE7491RS

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