There are two types of motors used in table saws: universal motors and induction motors. With a universal motor, the power source is linked directly to the blade, providing a whole lot of power. The downside is that these models are generally quite loud. Induction motors, on the other hand, are connected to a belt that then transfers power to the blade. As a result, you get quieter operation and the ability to cut dense materials. The downside is that these models require more preventive maintenance, as you have to adjust the belt’s tension periodically. 

The legs fold easily with an intuitive mechanism that feels well thought out, and the safety attachments stow away within the unit, reducing its form factor and allowing it to be tucked away in a corner when not in use. However, the unit does weigh 90 pounds, so if you’re going to be loading it in and out of a truck bed several times a day or needing to haul it up and down the stairs where the wheels can’t help you, you may want to look at a lighter job site saw that dispenses with the stand.

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dewalt dwe7491rs buy


I am looking at getting a saw, and this has helped, but still leaves a lot of confusion. most of my work would be diy projects, maybe shelving, who really know. The main reason for buying one, is I am looking to build some SUP’s. (Stand Up Paddle boards) I will be ripping 10-12′ 1/4″ strips that maybe in the 3/8″ up to 3″ range, along with re-sawing some wider planks into the 1/4″ thick, 5-6″ wide plank’s. I have been going back and forth on the Dewalt dwe7491rs vs the Delta 36-725t2 vs the comparable Ridgid. Any thoughts? the Dewalt would be nice as it packs away in a smaller space, but the delta/ridgid would also be easily moved out of the way. with the Dewalt, I would probably end up making an outfeed bench. price points they are all similar, I am just not sure what would be the best for this type of work. thanks for any input.

The table saw is run on battery and that is why it is regarded as one of the best models available with battery. The user though needs to purchase the battery separately. The device is not suitable for hard woodworking activities due to the blade size it comprises. Durability is good with a 3 year limited warranty and 1 year free service with 90 day money back guarantee.

miter groove dwe7491rs


This table saw was completely redesigned and heavily improved in both safety measures and cutting capacity. For safety, DeWalt redesigned the red power switch to be electronic. It automatically resets the saw to turn off if the power is interrupted whatever the cause. I’ve heard some job-site horror stories regarding table saws who weren’t turned off properly so this redesign was very much needed.
On the other end of the handyman spectrum, you’ve got the seasoned professional with years of experience under his belt. We all know the type: he’s the guy that expects only the best, and DEWALT more than delivers with their patented DWE7491RS. This wood-slicing machine is the cream of the crop when it comes to cutting through even the toughest materials. The DWE7491RS measures 26.25 x 22 inches, so it’s a relatively large apparatus—you’re going to want to make sure that you have plenty of space in your garage for this table saw.

But it’s a journey that’s still in progress. The DCS7485B is lightweight and portable, and it’s also very quiet. What it can’t do is hard work for an extended period. The battery just isn’t there and the trade-off for 60 volts of power limits the range of what you can legitimately expect to cut through. It’s possible to upgrade the battery, but our reviews are based on what comes inside the box. And what comes inside the box with this one has a good deal of promise for only a little bit of delivery.

DeWalt DWE7480 10 ″ table saw review for compact construction


"The built-in stand sets this saw apart from competitors since it is actually quite stable out of the box and doesn’t require a custom stand or supports to combat vibration, which are often necessary with cheaper and lighter units. DeWalt sells a nearly identical saw with a less-robust stand, and after viewing it in a big box store, I was glad to have this one."—Justin Park, Product Tester

dwe7491rs for carpentry


Our review of DeWalt table saws focused on two models that are very, very similar and one that harkens great advancements in the tool line that sadly has yet to fully come to fruition. The DWE7491RS and DW745 are very similar. The 7491 is slightly more powerful but also slightly heavier and both have miter gauges that should be replaced when purchasing the saws themselves. But the differences are slight enough that our choice of top pick comes down to the 7491’s larger rip capacity. That’s something that won’t affect a lot of people very often, so if your dollars are tight, you can go with a better for-dollar value with the DW745.
The same goes for the kind of work you expect to do. Although a table saw is a pretty serious investment, you can trim money off your purchase if you don’t need something that will go through ash like a katana through a zombie. If you need the power or anticipate needing it in the future, you’ll want to invest extra to get it. So, be honest about what you’re going to need and tailor your major purchase to meet those needs.

What is a fence? How important is it in a table saw? It gives you an option for horizontal or vertical adjustments. A good rip fence should be aligned to the blade at all times. Without a fence, everything will be disgusting. Ensure that it is heavy and that it can glide smoothly across the rails. Also, make sure that the locking mechanism is perfect and convenient.


With a maximum cut depth of 3.125 inches and a 32.5-inch rip capacity, the 10-inch blade of this DeWalt table saw handled all the relatively light-duty board ripping I needed from it, but I also tested it against a variety of plywood and other board sizes to assess its capability. The 15-amp motor is fairly standard for this contractor or job site level of table saw, and none of the boards I threw at it caused it to bind—good news, as binding is at best annoying and at worst dangerous.

The built-in stand sets this saw apart from competitors since it is actually quite stable out of the box and doesn’t require a custom stand or supports to combat vibration, which are often necessary with cheaper and lighter units. DeWalt sells a nearly identical saw with a less robust stand, and after viewing it in a big box store, I was glad to have this one.

DEWALT table saw holder, mobile / rolling (DW7440RS)

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