Porter-Cable comes in as the most expensive of the value group, but also with the best overall performance in it. Of the three saws in this class, it had the best cutting power and also came in the top spot overall for height and bevel adjustment thanks to independent wheels. This may seem like a small consideration, but when you actually need to cut accurately beveled pieces, the adjustment wheel is a huge benefit over sliding the front height adjustment around.

For those of you who are looking to up your DIY game but don’t have enough capital to make the Dewalt DW745 happen for your home shop, this Craftsman is a decent budget choice. It’s powerful, lightweight, and extremely affordable. We don’t think you should expect too much from this one, though, since it has a very light table and a fence that won’t line up quite as precisely as you’d need for furniture-making or professional-grade projects. It’s cheaply-made, and doesn’t have as user-friendly a design as our other choices. For the home carpenter, though, this should do the trick for all your basic framing cuts.
The price is okay. SawStop is a well-known manufacturer, and they have a pretty good quality control department. In simpler words, it may seem expensive to some, but it’s well-worth the money, especially if you’re a professional. A vast majority of DIY enthusiasts don’t want to make a huge investment in order to tackle a few minor projects; therefore, most of them tend to skip on buying a professional cabinet saw.
You will need specialty blades for cutting materials such as plywood, masonry, hardwood and metals. Other specialty blades are used for dado cuts. Most dado sets have multiple rows of teeth and chippers and they are typically much wider than traditional blades. Be sure that the model of table saw you have can accommodate the type of specialty blades you want to get so you don’t waste your money on a blade that won’t fit.
Disclosure: daringabroad.com blog is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Additionally, daringabroad.com participates in several other affiliate programs, and we sometimes get a commission through purchases made through our links.
We’re loving the guard system on this Bosch. It’s modular, like the Dewalt’s, so you won’t have to use any tools to set it up, take it down, or make adjustments. Like the Dewalt, this unit has a clear guard, with independent panels, kickback pawls, and a riving knife. The riving knife on this one is a standout feature for us, since it adjusts to three different positions, depending on what kind of cut you’re making. It’s a smart design tweak that saves you needing to have several differences riving knives

The Porter-Cable looks like a beefed-up version of the Craftsman, with the same blade guard and anti-kickback pawls. This is the only saw in our test with a blade-tilting handwheel, which makes it easier to dial in a precise bevel angle. The motor mount and blade controls on this saw are very sturdy, without much play, which translates to a good-quality cut. Extending the fence for a wide rip requires a bit of effort on this saw, since the rails are stiff. All in all, this is a great saw for the price.


All table saws sold in the U.S. come with a riving knife, anti-kickback pawls, and a split blade guard. Because some cuts can’t be made with these safety features installed, they are removable. If you’re looking for a fun party game, see who of your uninitiated friends can install both correctly without a manual. While each one is different, their nature means you can use the saw without them installed. I’d be remiss if I didn’t tell you those cuts are more dangerous, so avoid it if you can.
Table saws will use one of two different kinds of drive configurations; Direct-drive motors and Belt-drive motors. In a direct-drive motor, they will link directly to the blade itself and transfer all of the power of the motor to the blade. They tend to last longer than belt drive motors and there is no belt to replace or worry about getting worn out. Belt drive motors transfer power from the motor to the blade through a belt. In this type of configuration, the motor can be offset away from the sawdust which helps the motor last longer. In general, belt drive motors need more preventative maintenance than direct-drive motors do. If you have a belt drive motor, check the tension of your belts as well as checking them for wear periodically to ensure your continued safety.
I bought this saw to add to my home shop and a radial arm saw I have had for years. I have owned it since 2009. I bought it after reading reviews in woodworking magazines on line. I did buy the left extension, which I use frequently. This saw has been used for multiple projects, including building furniture, cabinets, cabinet doors and a host of other projects for home, family and friends. It has never let me down, working flawlessly. It has never been out of square. And, yes, I do check squareness every time I use it. Cuts are accurate and the table large enough to manage most jobs without adding an extension. The metal construction is particularly appreciated. The blade is easy to replace, the controls and storage on the unit convenient. What I particularly have enjoyed is the portability and the ease of use of the gravity-rise stand. Being able to move tools around and re-arrange my limited workspace to match the job is important to me. I have read the caveats posted by a number of reviewers, but, in truth, those have simply not been my experience. At 71 with a lifetime of using and buying tools and enjoy woodworking, I count this tool as among one of my better purchases.

The fence on a table saw is one of its defining features and allows for precise, square, and repeatable cuts. Not all fences are equal though and a poorly built fence is a deal-breaker, in my opinion. Not only will a poorly built and implemented fence affect the quality of your cuts, but a fence that moves or is not square to the blade can cause your material to bind and kickback.

A table saw has two main ways it can seriously hurt you. One is obvious and that is having any part of your body come into contact with the blade. Any table saw you are seriously considering should have a blade guard installed. The clearer the better. And make sure you leave it on. The blade guard can’t do its intended job from a workbench or shelf.

As far as the durability goes, it’s great. The materials used in the production of various components are sturdy and also quite reliable. The accuracy is at a high level meaning you won’t have issues with the precision of this table saw, even if you’re an absolute beginner. On the other hand, make sure you make the necessary adjustments when you unbox the tool, before turning it on. If you don’t know how refer to the user manual, it’s comprehensive and well-written.
Table saws can pose a serious risk of injury, since part of the spinning blade comes up above the surface of the table where it can come into contact with the user's hand as it guides the wood. Thanks to voluntary safety standards introduced by Underwriters Laboratories (UL) in 2007, pretty much all table saws now come with blade guards that minimize the risk. Modern guard systems are easier to remove and replace as needed – an important feature because inconvenient blade guards are apt to be left off the saw.

And finally, they all include a blade guard that can be removed and reinstalled without tools. Because a few sawing operations, such as non-through cuts, require you to remove the blade guard, we like saws that make this task easy. The Bosch, DeWalt and Ridgid saws have well-designed blade guards that are easy to remove and reinstall. The blade guards on all but the Porter-Cable and Craftsman also have a feature that holds the blade guard in the raised position to allow better blade visibility for setting up cuts.

While a miter saw is indispensable, having a great table saw is a wonderful way to broaden the scope of your woodworking. Whether you want miters or bevels, rips or compound cuts, the best table saw is a highly versatile woodworking equipment. Not only can you perform a healthy range of different cuts, you can also hook up various accessories to your table saw. Table saws are truly multi-purpose in the workshop.
Though you’ll still want to wear safety gear when using this table saw, it has safety features that will keep you safe too. One of those features is an emergency stop. One touch of the bright green power button brings the motor to life, but when you lift up on the emergency stop that surrounds the power button, you can stop the motor in its tracks. This button has a convenient design that lets you hit and lift it with your leg or knee too.

We used the Freud calibration plate on each of the test saws to measure runout. We removed the new Diablo blade, installed the calibration plate, and raised the trunnion to its maximum vertical adjustment. Before measuring the runout, we placed a black mark on the calibration plate to give a consistent starting position for the runout test. The same iGauging dial indicator provided the test measurements, only this time, the units were set to read out in mm. TBB noticed that in the initial saws, the movements were sufficiently small to need the smaller metric units.
Besides that, materials are expensive, and when you ruin even a couple of pricey work pieces with a saw that doesn’t provide accurate cut you will end up paying far more for that cheap saw than you anticipated. Having a good saw that you can depend on for accuracy and efficiency is a solid business move for any contractor. Both the DW745 and the Bosch 4100 have a true riving knife, anti-kickback pawls, and a blade guard to prevent kickback and possible injury.
Located right next to the hand wheel on the front is a panel that features both a power button and a stop switch. The power button helps the motor come to life quickly without requiring that it heat up first, and you can press down on this button to turn the saw off at the end of the day. The emergency stop switch helps you stop the blade in the middle of a project to prevent accidents caused by clothing or skin coming into contact with the blade.
PLEASE EXCUSE THE PICTURE, LUMBER JOCKS REQUIRED ONE. I AM AWAY FROM HOME AND COULDN’t RUN OUT TO THE GARAGE TO SNAP A SHOT. I am writing a review of my Bosch saw after a few months of use. I bought this saw last November after my Ryobi saw up and died during a project. I looked at several saws in the $600-$800 range and narrowed it down to four options. The Bosch and DeWalt jobsite saws, and the Delta and Ridgid contractor saws. My requirements were in a realativly compact saw th...

Next, the rip fence is pretty hard to adjust also, and mine had a few thousandths of a bow, but that bow is way within industry standard for a portable saw. Here's what you do: First, check it for parallel, you might get lucky. (On a side note, there is a fine line between how tight to set the locking arm adjustment screw with this rip fence. Too tight, and when you lock it, you'll loose the self-adjustment feature, too loose isn't good either. Adjust the screw (on the rear of the fence), to where the fence self aligns while still getting tight) If you are like me, mine was 15 thousandths out, then unlock the locking handle and loosen the two screws on top closest to you in THIS ORDER! Loosen the screw closest to the lock handle first, and for a few turns. Next, loosen the screw that is about 6 inches away toward the middle just enough to where the fence will rotate on this screw, but not so much as to be sloppy. Begin experimenting. Pivot the fence back and forth, running your measuring device up and down the fence until you get pretty close. Lock handle and checking for parallel. Again and again. When you finally get pretty close to parallel, then lock the lever and experiment with locking both screws. If it doesn't move and you are within a few thousandths, then voila, you are done with adjusting the blade and rip fence for parallel. The other adjustments are straight forward, and once set up, THIS IS A GREAT SAW!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Good luck, hope this review helps
As accidents and injuries are common when using large power tools like this one, it’s important that you look for safety features such as a dust collection system. Inhaling the sawdust that comes off the wood can make you sick, but this system does a good job of removing the dust from your work area. The collection port itself has a convenient on the cabinet too.
The design is not bad. The height of this particular table saw is around 35 inches. While some people don’t mind it, we think it could have been designed better. However, the best thing about the design is the fact that you can get both contractor and cabinet style table saws in one unit. Dust control is well-designed. The large 4-inch dust port offers a no-hassle setup, especially with vacuums of lower quality. In simpler words, you don’t need to purchase a super-expensive vacuum for this particular unit; any affordable one should do the job well.
Cabinet table saws are the best choice for full-time professional woodworkers with a dedicated workshop. If you have a spacious shop, these are some of the most efficient, versatile cutting tools you can buy, especially for larger stock. With 3+ HP motors, they’re by far the most powerful machines you can get your hands on. Plus, their heavy, machined build quality gives you a precision and smoothness in your work that really compliments the professional. They have the most effective dust collection systems of any table saw, and durability that can last more than a lifetime.
Setup was nearly as simple as SawStop’s with just a narrow margin between them. We only needed to attach the handle and bolt the saw down to the stand. The stand is a gravity rise style, but requires you to bend down to ground level for collapsing and extending it. It’s a reasonably solid platform, though a lot of movement throughout the day will leave your back sore.
TBB used the same iGauging 35-125-4 digital dial indicator to measure the accuracy of the as-delivered factory fence to the table miter slot. We started by placing the fence in a locked position about 1” away from the blade on the opposite side from the miter slot. We adjusted the throw of the dial indicator so that we took the readings on the indicator, as before, in the middle of the indicator’s range of movement.
The Grizzly, like the other cabinet models you’ll see here, requires a 220V power supply. If you’re a professional woodworker, you probably already have a 220V hookup. If you’re a home woodworker or DIYer, you’ll need to have one installed, if you haven’t already. It can be an expensive installation, so factor in the cost when you consider how much you’ll spend on your new saw.

post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-5859,single-format-standard,mkd-core-1.0.2,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,table saw theme-child-ver-1.0.0,onyx-ver-1.4.1,vertical_menu_enabled, vertical_menu_left, vertical_menu_width_290,vertical_menu_background_opacity_over_slider vertical_menu_background_opacity_over_slider_on,smooth_scroll,side_menu_slide_from_right,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.7.4,vc_responsive
The first thing you should do before starting up your unit is to check whether you’re wearing all the necessary safety equipment. Gloves are something not many people like to wear. Apart from keeping your fingers safe, they also offer protection against thorns. As you may assume, you’ll work with a lot of thorns flying around. However, gloves aren’t mandatory, and they won’t offer much protection apart from occasional thorns.
As far as the durability goes, it’s great. The materials used in the production of various components are sturdy and also quite reliable. The accuracy is at a high level meaning you won’t have issues with the precision of this table saw, even if you’re an absolute beginner. On the other hand, make sure you make the necessary adjustments when you unbox the tool, before turning it on. If you don’t know how refer to the user manual, it’s comprehensive and well-written.
It’s sturdy. This unit also has a metal roll cage frame all around, which helps it handle the rough and tumble of travelling to worksites on a regular basis. It has a locking mechanism to help it stay securely on stands. We’re also super impressed by how well-made the adjustment knobs feel on this one. Buyers reported using this one for several years with no issues.

I’m no stranger to Bosch’s 4100-09 saw with Gravity-Rise™ stand. I’ve used one several times to build projects for this magazine, including the Serving Tray Cart that appeared in the June issue. So, I was not surprised when it tested impressively here. Rip cuts were on the mark, thanks to a rugged, beefy fence that stayed parallel to the blade each time I reset it. A flip of a red lever underneath unlocks the rails so they slide out and extend ripping capacity up to 25″.


Hitachi C10RJ 10 in. job site table saw features a powerful, industrial grade 15 A motor that operates at 4,500 RPM, giving you the ripping power to cut through even the toughest woods. This Hitachi table saw has a 0-45 degree bevel and height adjustments. One of the best features is its large work table which also has a telescoping extension, allowing rip cuts up to 35 in. wide! When you pair the power of this table saw with the bevel range and table size, you’ll be able to power through any project you throw at it! Other great features include: front mounted controls, over sized controls, integrated safety switch, and a soft start function that helps decrease recoil at startup.
Safety is at a pretty high level, to say the least. There are a few integrated mechanisms that prevent accidents from happening, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t handle it with care. Also, don’t forget to wear safety equipment at all times. Whether you’re a professional or a beginner, you’ll definitely like this particular model due to its versatility and a wide array of potential.
All seven saws in the best table saw testing have some kind of dust control. The Rockwell saw has a completely enclosed motor compartment with a large dust bag that attaches under the saw to catch sawdust. The remaining saws have a shroud around the blade and a 2-1/2-in. port on the back for attaching either a bag or a vacuum cleaner. None were perfect, but at least you can catch most of the sawdust. The Craftsman and Ryobi also include a dust bag that attaches to the vacuum cleaner port.
Ridgid’s fence is outstanding for its design. Its large front plate helps stabilize it and the whole thing just feels solid. There’s very little play compared to some of the others and we were consistently able to lock it down perfectly square. We like the pinion style bevel adjustment. It’s not quite a good as a separate adjustment wheel, but a great improvement over simple sliding. We also like the independent locks for both height and bevel. It’s not often that a height lock would be required, but there’s an element of confidence that comes from knowing it won’t be going anywhere.
Both saws accomplish the same thing, but with different results. SawStop’s feature takes about 90 seconds to recover from compared to roughly 1 minute with Bosch. Bosch developed the REAXX to drop the blade without damage while SawStop usually results in a damaged blade that needs to be replaced. The SawStop employs a brake that must be changed after activation at a cost of $69 each. Bosch uses a dual airbag style cartridge. These run $99 each, but you get two shots out of each one.
You’ll make most of your miter cuts on a miter saw. But when the material you’re cutting exceeds a miter saw’s cross-cutting capacity, you turn to your table saw miter gauge. These usually aren’t quite as precise, but some manufacturers put more thought and robustness into it than others. If you make a lot of long miter cuts, be sure to pay attention to this accessory.
Our biggest surprise while running the best table saw review tests was in the cutting power and the quality of cut: There wasn’t much difference among them. All these saws ripped through 3-in.-thick oak without hesitating. We tried this test with the stock blades that came on the saws. Then we repeated the test using a top-quality blade in each saw.
When you’re thinking about build quality, you should consider how often, and how intensively you’ll be using your portable table saw. The more you’ll use it, the more you should invest in a sturdy unit that’s built to handle all that use. If you’re only an occasional DIYer, on the other hand, you can probably stand to have a few more plastic parts on your unit, since you aren’t going to be putting it to the rest as often.
Dust capture from this saw is pretty bad. I was shocked that a European brand would ignore the dust collection to this extent – at least I was until I discovered that their version of the 4100 does have quite a few more pieces that help pull most of the dust from the airstream. There is a plate that encloses the rear around the vacuum port and a bottom grid that allow airflow to the motor while still shaping the airstream to drive the dust to the vac. I added the plate, but decided against the grid. Instead, I added a sheet of ¼” plywood and put a 4” vacuum port in it that I hook up to my dust collector. I also replaced the blade guard with the European version that has a dust port built in. Minor upgrades, but dust capture has gone from terrible/non-existent to pretty acceptable. Bosch also sell a bag that will capture whatever dust would get tossed out the back of the saw, but that isn’t much, so I consider it a waste. I did buy it, and it works well on other tools, but it is not IMO a must-have for the 4100
You’ll want to look for metal framing, and a design which allows for all the most delicate components to be stored inside the tool’s body. If you’re a DIYer who won’t be travelling with your saw often, you probably don’t need to worry about finding such a heavy-duty frame. Many portable units will fit easily on the passenger’s seat, so you won’t have to deal with wear and tear so much.
We’re loving the guard system on this Bosch. It’s modular, like the Dewalt’s, so you won’t have to use any tools to set it up, take it down, or make adjustments. Like the Dewalt, this unit has a clear guard, with independent panels, kickback pawls, and a riving knife. The riving knife on this one is a standout feature for us, since it adjusts to three different positions, depending on what kind of cut you’re making. It’s a smart design tweak that saves you needing to have several differences riving knives
All these saws have attached, collapsible stands with wheels that allow you to roll them around when they’re folded up. A few, like the DeWalt, Rockwell and Ryobi, can’t be wheeled around after they’re set up. But the biggest difference between stands is in how easy it is to set them up. The Ridgid and Bosch have nearly identical stands that work great and require you to only flip or depress one lever to unlock the stand. These are our favorites. The DeWalt stand is the sturdiest of the bunch and very intuitive. It sets up like a card table with legs that fold out and snap into place. The remaining candidates for best table saw have several different stand systems that aren’t quite as easy to set up but that work fine once you get the hang of them.

We had a number of these saws – and I bought one for my own use (travelling to my kids houses and for garage use) since my old Unisaw with sliding table isn’t exactly portable. My take on the blade – is that the old 40T one (Bosch CBT1040A) was not worth anything much – so the change to a 24T blade can’t hurt (zero time anything is still zero). They generally bundle saws with cheap blades to keep the overall price down – but when I was buying in many multiples – I would have been happy for $10 off each if I had a “no-blade” option.


Cabinet table saws are the best choice for full-time professional woodworkers with a dedicated workshop. If you have a spacious shop, these are some of the most efficient, versatile cutting tools you can buy, especially for larger stock. With 3+ HP motors, they’re by far the most powerful machines you can get your hands on. Plus, their heavy, machined build quality gives you a precision and smoothness in your work that really compliments the professional. They have the most effective dust collection systems of any table saw, and durability that can last more than a lifetime.
Install new blade- With the new blade, face the teeth of so they are pointing to the front of the saw table. Place the blade on the housing. Secure the new blade with the washer and nut with the use of a wrench. Make sure you are turning the wrench in a clockwise motion. Use the small piece of wood to secure the blade in place while you are securing it.

If you’re a professional looking for a great table saw for the worksite, you’ll love the features and performance of the DEWALT DWE7480. Equipped with the Site-Pro Modular Guarding System has a rack and pinion telescoping fence rail that will allow you to make fast, smooth and accurate adjustments. This is the perfect table saw for cutting larger shelving and trim easily. With a 15 AMP 4800 rpm motor, you will go through all types of wood, even hardwood, with ease.

Another important safety feature to consider is a magnetic switch. Magnetic switches are there in case of power cuts or outages and will also protect the table saw motor from over load. Effectively it will switch off the power supply the instant the power goes off ensuring you don’t have a saw blade spinning away in the dark! As you can imagine this is a very useful and must have safety feature when looking to purchase a new table saw.

Table saws in this best table saw review run the gamut in price and quality. You can buy a table saw for as little as $150, and if you use it just to occasionally rip a board, that may be all the saw you need. If you want a saw that’s easy to carry and you don’t need to rip sheets of plywood in half, look for a “compact” saw like the DeWalt DW745 (shown) or the Bosch GTS1031. If you have room for a little larger saw that’s slightly less portable but capable of wide rips, consider one of the best table saws we review here. And finally, if you want to build cabinets or furniture and have a big enough work area, you can step up to a stationary contractor’s saw like the Ridgid R4512 (shown), for about $650.
You’ll want to look for metal framing, and a design which allows for all the most delicate components to be stored inside the tool’s body. If you’re a DIYer who won’t be travelling with your saw often, you probably don’t need to worry about finding such a heavy-duty frame. Many portable units will fit easily on the passenger’s seat, so you won’t have to deal with wear and tear so much.
The simplest way to find out what size your table saw needs or indeed if you’re buying a special size is to consult the table saw user Manuel. I would make sure you do this as often there are many things in modern tables saws that could affect the blade size and type. This is because modern saws have many different amazing and varied features, things size blade guards, special safety mechanisms and arbor sizes etc. With the We recommend you spend some time reading your manual in detail to avoid possible issues

It’s just as powerful as our other recommendations. The SawStop has a 3HP belt-driven motor, and like the Jet, it uses a tweaked multi-belt drive system to transfer maximum power from the drive shaft to the blade. That makes for as powerful a cabinet saw as any on the market. This one slices smoothly through anything you can feed into it. It also has a slightly thicker max cutting depth than our other recommendations, so it’s the better choice for sturdy stock.


One important aspect to consider when buying a new table saw or looking for a new blade is axis adjustment. Being able to adjust the vertical height of the blade allows you to control the depth of the cut, it’s also useful when you don’t need to cut all the way through the wood, especially useful with thick pieces of wood. To help making bevel cuts and joints you can adjust the blade to certain angles that you require.

Even though is seems pretty irrelevant, the position of the On/Off switch is quite important, especially if you’re a frequent user of these tools. In today’s models, the switch is usually leveled with your knees. The main thing you should look for is the size of the OFF switch. It has to be big enough so that you can turn the unit off immediately either with your knees, elbows, or hands. The so-called panic button is one of the crucial elements of every unit, even if it doesn’t seem like it.
It’s tough to be completely objective when choosing the best portable jobsite table saw since the stock blades vary so widely. Skilsaw comes with a 30-tooth Diablo blade and Makita’s stock 32-tooth blade are both excellent while others could use some help. To make this shootout about the saws and not the blades, we turned to Diablo to outfit each saw with the same accessory.
Overall, the Dewalt's combination blade leaves a slightly smoother finish, but both brands' general purpose construction blades are good enough to start off with. Cross and rip-cut edges were fairly smooth, but users who plan to cut down a lot of plywood will definitely want to invest in a more suitable saw blade. Both saws provided ample cutting power without a noticeable difference in cutting speeds, so we're calling this one a tie.
You can’t talk about the best portable jobsite table saw without talking about portability. Portability boils down to a couple of important features. First and foremost, weight has a huge impact on how easily you can transport the saw, especially if it has to go into the bed of a truck rather than a trailer. If you’ve got a trailer, then a wheeled stand becomes your best friend. We looked at both.
The machine has a more conventional rip fence/rail arrangement. The right half of the rail assembly folds out so the saw can achieve its full 30″ of rip capacity — wider than any other model here — but the fence would not slide smoothly over the rails without catching on the hinge joint. While the rip fence did maintain its locked settings, it lacks the heft and build quality of the competition.
It’s more compact than the Grizzly, and it uses its space efficiently. The Jet only has one extension table, but it makes the most of it. This one gets nearly the same rip capacity as the much larger Grizzly–to within 2 inches! There’s also a closed-off drawer in the bottom of the cabinet, which is ideal for storing all your smaller table saw accessories.

On the downside, Delta have changed things up over the past few years, and the news isn’t all good. The motor is still made in the USA, but the frame and structure of the saw is all imported. Recent buyers have reported shoddy quality control and very poor customer service since the company was taken over. Even though the Unisaw still gets great professional reviews, buyers’ experiences are so mixed that we’re not comfortable recommending this one as one of our top picks.

We’ve used $2,000 as our minimum spending threshold on these models, because that’s what we’ve found you have to pay for a cabinet model with all the features we consider essential: a precision-machined cast-iron worktop, a versatile fence on sliding tracks, a 3 HP motor with belt drive, an all-steel cabinet, a cast-iron trunnion support, and machined flywheels to adjust the blade settings.
Jeffery – As Rob explained things we had the RPM measurements running on that meter, and had to watch our video playback to evaluate the numbers (no recording of the numbers digitally). So we tried to take the average no load speed watching the video play back. Is it perfect? No….is a 10% difference a big deal? In this application I doubt it. If we were a full blown testing lab we’d have the data recorded digitally and take full blow averages, but alas we are not.
Safety and precision are usually at a high level. Some models even offer a sliding table as an option to mitigate cross-cutting. Needless to say, hobbyists love the sliding feature because it saves a lot of time and most importantly – nerves. As far as the driving mechanism goes, there are three possible options – single V-belt, serpentine belt, and a multiple V-belts.
Makita joins DeWalt with an external riving knife release so you don’t have to reach into the throat to loosen it. We actually ran into an issue with the design because of a slightly bent plate holding the knife in place. That aside, the intent of the design is sound and should make for an an easier experience. Because of the external release, Makita screws down the throat plate in place. You should only need to get in there for blade changes if everything functions properly.
If you are an avid hobbyist, this saw is made just for you. The company is known for its uncompromising quality and durability. This saw has a safety system where the blade stops and retracts automatically when it comes into contact with anything that is not wood.  The microblade guards keep debris from flying all over your workshop. It is easy to change between blades. You will not require a riving knife to do this. Its award-winning dust collection system ensures that you have a clean and presentable workspace at the end of the day.
×