Perfect for both hobbyists and craftsmen, the PCS31230-TGP252 from SawStop is a 3 HP cabinet saw that delivers excellent performance while featuring the company’s patented safety system to ensure maximum safety during use. The safety system is similar to that of the G0690 from Grizzly where the blade stops in milliseconds after it comes in contact with flesh. Designed and built in order to satisfy the needs of the most demanding users, the PCS31230-TGP252 features an exacting finish and feet and a superior dust collection system. For increased precision and added strength, the PCS31230-TGP252 features a fifty two inch T-Glide fence system, but also an extension table and rails.


For the woodworking professional, the 3-horsepower SawStop Professional Cabinet Saw PCS31230-TGP236 is the top pick. Its superior safety features include an excellent riving knife and blade guard system and a unique flesh-sensing blade brake to prevent cuts. Reviewers also praise its performance, exceptional dust control, and overall ease of use. Less expensive versions with 1.75-hp motors are also available (Est. $2,300 and up). The warranty is two years for the saw and five for the motor.

Besides that, materials are expensive, and when you ruin even a couple of pricey work pieces with a saw that doesn’t provide accurate cut you will end up paying far more for that cheap saw than you anticipated. Having a good saw that you can depend on for accuracy and efficiency is a solid business move for any contractor. Both the DW745 and the Bosch 4100 have a true riving knife, anti-kickback pawls, and a blade guard to prevent kickback and possible injury.
One of the biggest perks of a cabinet table saw, aside from the rugged construction and wide worktop, is the sheer power of the tool. You should expect a cabinet table saw to cut absolutely any stock within its depth capacity smoothly and easily. Look for motors with at least 3 HP, and sophisticated belt drive systems which translate that grunt into 4000+ RPM blade speeds. Don’t accept lesser power ratings on a cabinet model: these are the gold standard of table saws for a reason!
The DeWalt, Bosch and Ridgid saws have strong stands that are easier to set up, sturdy fences that lock down parallel to the blade every time, and smooth-operating blade controls. If you’re a contractor or an avid DIYer who just likes top-quality tools that feel good and last a long time, we think the extra few hundred dollars is a good investment.
It’s often overwhelming when looking for new power tools and products online. So many features, specs and brands etc to research and review. So, what should you look for when buying a new table saw? One thing we always mention is to make sure you read as many table saw reviews as you can before purchasing one, this will insure you have the best table saw for your requirements.
One of the first things many Pros do is permanently (and intentionally) lose the blade guard and anti-kickback pawls. While they are a pain to install and store onboard, their ability to reduce the risk of injury is significant. Table saws are responsible for thousands of injuries every year and there are plenty of guys running around with stories of how they got injured. So practice installing them until it feels natural and then actually use them onsite.
The Popular Woodworking site hasn't published many reviews of table saws recently; the newest one we found was from 2013. There are no comparison reviews and no ratings or recommendations to help you compare different models. Nonetheless, this site is useful because it's one of the few places to find detailed coverage of larger contractor and cabinet saws.
We’ve used $2,000 as our minimum spending threshold on these models, because that’s what we’ve found you have to pay for a cabinet model with all the features we consider essential: a precision-machined cast-iron worktop, a versatile fence on sliding tracks, a 3 HP motor with belt drive, an all-steel cabinet, a cast-iron trunnion support, and machined flywheels to adjust the blade settings.
Last but not least, you need to pay attention to the dust collecting capabilities of a particular model. Portable units usually have a weak dust-collecting capacity, but they aren’t foreseen for large projects. However, all other types do feature some kind of dust collecting system. The first thing you should check is the diameter of the dust port. The larger it is, the less debris you’ll have flying around. Also, check out the vacuum requirements because some models work only with super-expensive vacuums. As you can assume, the thing that’s lacking with those models is cost efficiency. However, if you don’t have budget limitations, feel free to invest in a high-end vacuum, it makes a huge difference.
Previous buyers said they were at a loss to find materials that the Jet couldn’t cut! They said it went like butter, with no lag whatsoever, and almost no vibration at all. Reviewers raved about the motor’s power, and especially complimented how steadily it ran. This is an excellent choice for hardwoods, thick softwoods, and composite boards: absolutely anything that’ll fit.

One notable feature on the Bosch is an arbor lock button, enabling easy blade changes. Changing the blade on most table saws is an onerous task, requiring the user to reach under the saw with one wrench to hold the arbor still while using another wrench to loosen the bolt holding the blade in place. Because of the difficulty involved, many users choose to continue using a dull blade, rather than expend the effort to change it. Dull table saw blades can result in poor cutting ability, split-out, burn marks, and possibly dangerous kickbacks. The arbor lock button helps to eliminate some of the difficulty involved in blade changes, taking some of the dread out of the process. Popular Mechanics referred to this feature as, “so handy it ought to be an industry standard”. It is the only manufacturer in the industry to offer this feature.


Let’s face it: guys get in each other's’ way at a job site. It’s not always easy to find room to work, so portability is a serious advantage when it comes to making the most out of your space. Luckily for the professionals out there — not to mention hobbyists who prefer to move around rather than work in the same spot everyday — RIDGID’s 15-amp table saw comes with a convenient mobile cart for stress-free transportation.
Under the table, you’ll find plenty of space to store away your accessories. This is valuable if you’re working on site and don’t want to keep hunting down bits and pieces. You’ll be able to stash your arbor wrench and Allen wrenches close to hand. The rip fence also flips upside down and can be stored under the table. It’s this kind of attention to detail for a jobsite saw that’s always appreciated.
Consider whether you’ll be working inside or outside, on even flooring or dirt ground. You’ll want to choose the most convenient stand that’s sturdy enough for the kind of cuts you need to make. Pros should pay for a premium stand that doesn’t have any wobble whatsoever. DIYers and framers can probably make do with something lightweight and inexpensive.
It is not a cabinet saw, so judging it by those standards would be unfair. As a portable job site saw this is amazing. Loud and dusty, sure, but that is expected. Easy to use and store, yes. The fence is square to the blade, and is rock solid, as long as you make sure the nut at the back of the fence is set right. The fence is not quite square to the table top, and I can't tweak it, but for construction I wouldn't care. I do other fussier things on the saw, so I will shim out an auxiliary fence. I made a cross-cut sled, which I recommend, and get thin kerf blades. I got a rip, general, and fine finish blades, and I get great results.
It’s highly portable. Even though the whole body feels sturdier than the Dewalt’s, it’s still relatively light, at just about 60 pounds. There are handles in both the top and bottom edges of the machine, for easy lifting, and once you’ve got the saw fixed to the base, you won’t have to lift it on your own except for when you’re loading it in the back of the truck/van.
The blades are categorized according to number of teeth, diameter, arbor size, kerf size, application and speed. They can also be divided by material. Regular commercial table saws are 10-inch or 12-inch. Teeth usually number from 24-80. Many blades are tipped with diamond, carbon or carbide. This lets you cut through more than just wood. You will also need to think about the tilt of the blade. They are available in left tilt or right tilt. With a left-tilting hybrid or cabinet saw, the motor cover can get in the way of the sliding table. Router table extensions don’t work well on left-tilting saws. 

Even though is seems pretty irrelevant, the position of the On/Off switch is quite important, especially if you’re a frequent user of these tools. In today’s models, the switch is usually leveled with your knees. The main thing you should look for is the size of the OFF switch. It has to be big enough so that you can turn the unit off immediately either with your knees, elbows, or hands. The so-called panic button is one of the crucial elements of every unit, even if it doesn’t seem like it.
We made a few test cuts with ¾-inch plywood just to get a feel of the motors we were working with. It became clear pretty quickly that not all 15 amp motors are equal. Once we knew what to expect, we moved to pressure treated 2x pine material in 7-1/2 foot lengths. Why 7-1/2? Our test material started at 15 feet and it seemed silly to have some at 8 feet and others at 6.
It is not a cabinet saw, so judging it by those standards would be unfair. As a portable job site saw this is amazing. Loud and dusty, sure, but that is expected. Easy to use and store, yes. The fence is square to the blade, and is rock solid, as long as you make sure the nut at the back of the fence is set right. The fence is not quite square to the table top, and I can't tweak it, but for construction I wouldn't care. I do other fussier things on the saw, so I will shim out an auxiliary fence. I made a cross-cut sled, which I recommend, and get thin kerf blades. I got a rip, general, and fine finish blades, and I get great results.
Safety and precision are usually at a high level. Some models even offer a sliding table as an option to mitigate cross-cutting. Needless to say, hobbyists love the sliding feature because it saves a lot of time and most importantly – nerves. As far as the driving mechanism goes, there are three possible options – single V-belt, serpentine belt, and a multiple V-belts.
The first thing you should do before starting up your unit is to check whether you’re wearing all the necessary safety equipment. Gloves are something not many people like to wear. Apart from keeping your fingers safe, they also offer protection against thorns. As you may assume, you’ll work with a lot of thorns flying around. However, gloves aren’t mandatory, and they won’t offer much protection apart from occasional thorns.
One of the things we looked at was the ease of assembly out of the box. We had the same person assemble each of the saws and timed the assembly to see if there are any significant differences between the models. The assembly time for the saws ranged from 21 minutes to 48 minutes. While some stands required more than twice the time, we felt the assembly time was not a significant enough factor to change someone’s mind on which saw to purchase.
Table saws will continue to be popular and much sought after tools in any workshop or construction site. There are many terrific styles on the market which is why it is important to do some research and look at the reviews provided here as well as the tips contained in this guide to help you choose the right table saw for your needs, whether you are a professional or a DIYer who loves to work in the workshop making things for enjoyment.
Another indication of how hard a table saw is working is monitoring the amperage (AMP) draw under loading conditions. We measured the amp draw for each saw using all three materials again at the same time we were recording RPMs. The first graph below shows the amp draw for each saw cutting plywood compared to the no-load amp draw. The white bar on the left indicates the no load amps and the colored bar on the right shows the maximum amp draw during the cut.
This saw is great. I needed a portable saw that was accurate and this fit the bill. All I can say is BUY THIS SAW if you are in the market for something portable. It has everything you want in a table saw. Dust collection is good with a shop vac and I like that the miter gauge is full size and not a ‘mini’ one that come with most portable saws. The fence is aluminum with built in T-track which is very nice. It’s quiet and has a soft-start. I was especially impressed with t...

We absolutely love the guard on this model. Like the Grizzly, the Jet is equipped with a riving knife or splitter, a blade guard, and kickback awls. The Jet’s our favorite of the two to use, because the whole system is modular: you can take it apart or put it back together without using any tools! The splitter (or riving knife) attaches to the same arbor component as the blade, so no matter how you bevel, and no matter what size blade you use, the splitter always lines up without needing any adjustments.

It has a machined aluminum table which is extremely precise. We like the Dewalt’s cast metal table for the price, but the company don’t list the material, and we suspect it’s not nearly as rugged as aluminum. The Bosch’s table is much better. It’s rugged, sturdy, and more consistently even than the Dewalt. The table makes this one a smarter choice for fine woodworkers or pros who need superior alignment.
These smaller table saws, which come in a compact benchtop setup rather than with legs like a traditional table saw, are designed as portable job site saws. But they work just as well in a home workshop, and are ideal for shops that are tight on space. The Bosch and the DeWalt have many of their specs in common: Both include a 15 Amp motor, 10-inch blade, 3 1/8-inch depth of cut when the blade is set at 90 degrees and 2.2-inch depth of cut at 45 degrees. And safety features on both saws include a riving knife, anti-kickback pawls, blade guard and an included push stick. Features The GTS1031 is Bosch's newest table saw, designed for portability and intended to be light enough that you could carry it with one hand. Its rip fence is designed for quick and easy movement, and clamps into channels on opposite sides of the table to keep things consistently square without the need for frequent adjustment. Two notable advantages for the GTS1031: Its 5000 RPM max no-load speed compared to the 3850 RPM for the DeWalt, and the fact that you can use a 1/2-inch dado set with it (though it requires separate TS1013 dado throat insert).
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Both the riving knife and the blade itself has a quick release design that lets you remove each one in minutes after accessing the arbor lock and without using any special tools either. The blade guard has a similar design that allows you to remove and replace it without any tools. This guard does a good job of keeping your hands and any other body parts safe as you use the saw.
In terms of cutting results, Craftsman’s 28463 Jobsite Table Saw made a decent showing. It delivered accurate rip cuts, kept its bevel setting for angled ripping and could handle a stacked dado blade without laboring. Dust collection through an enclosed shroud was on par with more expensive machines. I also appreciated the saw’s clear, split guard and a riving knife system that is easy to install and adjust up or down. These are the plusses of what, in this test, is the budget-priced tool.
Both saws were almost equally quick to setup for use, with the DeWalt coming out slightly ahead. The throat plate, which is thicker and sturdier than Bosch's, is slightly easier to remove and reinsert. The DeWalt's blade cavity offers greater clearance, which makes locking down and loosening the riving knife easier without scraping a knuckle. Dewalt's riving knife adjustment required less wiggling and hunting to get it set properly.

Excellent saw. Got here sooner then expected. Fairly simple to put together. Folding stand is very solid and easy to operate. Takes up very little space in my garage. I've never owned a table saw before so I'm easily impressed. Some other buyers recommended upgrading the blade, which I did. The blade it came with was ok but the Freud 10 in. 40 tooth Premier Fusion makes a very smooth cut. I haven't hooked up dust collection to it yet but it seems like it would work great. The scale for the fence is spot on. I would highly recommend this to any diy.
We made a few test cuts with ¾-inch plywood just to get a feel of the motors we were working with. It became clear pretty quickly that not all 15 amp motors are equal. Once we knew what to expect, we moved to pressure treated 2x pine material in 7-1/2 foot lengths. Why 7-1/2? Our test material started at 15 feet and it seemed silly to have some at 8 feet and others at 6.

Some table saws go one better than a splitter. Splitters are fixed. They do not move along with the blade. It also needs to be removed if you’re making cross-cuts or dado cuts. A riving knife, on the other hand, is fixed to the same part as the blade. This means it can move along with the blade. Riving knives don’t get in the way either so this is the best option.

If you are making a cut that will require your hands to get close to the blade, (within 6 inches) use a push stick or two to eliminate the chances of your hand touching the blade. If this is a big concern for you, maybe consider a saw that uses flesh detection to stop the blade. The additional cost of the saw will be instantly appreciated the first time you need it.

We really should point out a big deal here and that’s the SawStop. It’s hard to put a price on safety and while the SawStop costs more than 3 times what the Hitachi costs it does offer safety that no other saw in test can offer. For those that can afford the additional cost that feature alone may tip the scales for you. Regardless of price SawStop came in 5th place for the categories we evaluated.
Lack of mobility is the cabinet saws major drawback. Some cabinet saws need proper electrical wiring set up and often weigh a huge amount because of cast iron table tops and full cabinet like stands. But if your setting up a new wood shop or have a work space or wood shop of your own then there is no better investment you can make other than purchasing a cabinet table saw.

Included Components (1) Gravity Rise Table Stand, (1) 10 In. 40-Tooth Carbide-Tipped Saw Blade, (1) Standard Throat Plate Table Insert, (1) Smart Guard System, (1) Rip Fence, (1) Miter Gauge, (1) Push Stick, (1) Blade Wrench, (1) Hex Adjustment Wrench (1) table saw, (1) 24-tooth carbide saw blade, (1) rip fence, (1) miter gauge, (1) push stick, (2) blade-change wrenches SPT70WT 10-Inch Portable Worm Drive Table Saw, Rip Fence, Table Insert, Barrier Guard Assembly, Anti-Kickback Device, Miter Gauge, Push Stick, 10-Inch Carbide 24-Tooth Rip Cutting Blade, Blade Wrench, Hex Wrench, Manual bare-tool Bare-Tool Bare-Tool

The quiet, 220-volt motors in these saws cut through the hardest stock, hour after hour, without bogging down. Cabinets are metal and extend to the floor for the best dust collection. The tops are cast iron, wide, and stable, which makes it easy to cut sheet goods. The trunnions are cabinet-mounted, so you get minimal vibration and maximum accuracy. They're also heavy; some weigh over 600 pounds. Once a cabinet saw's in place, that's where it stays.


With a 32½" rip capacity and motor capable of up to 4800 rpm, the DWE7491RS is more than prepared to effectively deliver 3⅛" deep cuts to thick slabs of wood. Happy customers sing this machine’s praises, reporting that it’s as sturdy as a table saw can get — plus, it’s easy to use, and assembling it is a cinch. They do however note that workers looking to produce finer cuts should seek out a replacement blade since the one provided is more suited for fast, rough work. 
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