This table saw kit includes everything you need to get started with a 20-Volt MAX compact half-inch drill driver, two 20-Volt MAX lithium-ion 1.3 Ah battery packs, 20-Volt MAX charger and a carrying bag for the drill. You'll get a 15-Amp, 4800 RPM motor that has a 32.5-inch rip capacity to handle 4-by-8 plywood or OSB sheets. The table has on-board storage to give you a place to keep your guard, fence, wrenches and miter gauge when you aren't using them.

dwe7491rs what's in the box


I am looking at getting a saw, and this has helped, but still leaves a lot of confusion. most of my work would be diy projects, maybe shelving, who really know. The main reason for buying one, is I am looking to build some SUP’s. (Stand Up Paddle boards) I will be ripping 10-12′ 1/4″ strips that maybe in the 3/8″ up to 3″ range, along with re-sawing some wider planks into the 1/4″ thick, 5-6″ wide plank’s. I have been going back and forth on the Dewalt dwe7491rs vs the Delta 36-725t2 vs the comparable Ridgid. Any thoughts? the Dewalt would be nice as it packs away in a smaller space, but the delta/ridgid would also be easily moved out of the way. with the Dewalt, I would probably end up making an outfeed bench. price points they are all similar, I am just not sure what would be the best for this type of work. thanks for any input.

The first step always has to be to make sure that you match a saw with your actual needs. It’s a pretty simple thing to go out and buy the biggest, angriest saw available and call it good. But your genuine needs might be modest enough that the biggest, angriest saw is also too much saw, which means that you’re just throwing away a bunch of money. The same goes for weight. If you’re a small-framed person who has difficulty lugging around heavy, bulky objects, you’ll want to tailor your saw to your frame. If you can’t use it, it’s the same thing as not owning it.

DWE7491RS

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