Product reviews on this site contain our opinion of a product or service. We will always strive for objectivity and transparency in our reviews. Our goal is to provide readers with honest, objective information based on our own experiences. We never have and never will accept payment in exchange for a positive review. Many of the products that we review are provided to us for free by a manufacturer or retailer. In some cases, we also have advertising or affiliate relationships with manufacturers and retailers of products and services we review. For additional information please visit our additional disclosure policies.

Give yourself a reason to smile every time you enter in your workshop by investing in this powerful instrument. DEWALT as a company guarantee quality in all their products for the interests of customer satisfaction. This Jobsite table saw is not exceptional. Its designed to provide precision and last longer. The saw features pinion and rack system that makes adjusting the fence easy and convenient. In other words, you will not strain or shift your concentration while on work. The table saw is designed with a rolling stand that guarantees you professional performance in all your cuts. It also features telescoping fence rails that retract and extend for a small portable package of the saw. Additionally, the table saw is suitable for both wide and narrow rip cutting as the fence can adjust based on the type of material you are cutting. Using a 15amp motor, you are sure that the saw will get the job done within minutes and save you energy cost.
The DeWalt will do you proud for a broad spread of applications. If you’re a home woodworker, you’ll be able to rip sheet material, size material as thick as 3 inches, frame lumber and make cross cuts to your heart’s content. For professionals, the DeWalt is perfect for trim carpentry, installation of hardwood floors, decking or remodeling. There’s very little you can’t do with this beast.
There are several types of table saws. The types of jobs or projects you plan to use a table saw for will determine which type you buy. If you want a saw you can take from job site to job site and store it easily, then you will need a table saw that is made to be portable so that it can be easily transported to the job site. Of the portable or work site table saws on the market today, the Bosch 4100-09 10-Inch Worksite Table Saw with Gravity-Rise Stand and the DEWALT DW745 10-Inch Compact Job-Site Table Saw with 16-Inch Max Rip Capacity are two of the most popular.
In the commercial construction business, we typically buy a job site saw for each project and use it up during the course of an 18-month job. When these saws hit the site, they are unboxed, assembled and immediately put into use. We rip stacks and stacks of sheet goods with these saws and the tolerances of the cut materials are not very critical. However, that example represents the portable saw use within our commercial crews’ business.
Hitachi C10RJ 10 in. job site table saw features a powerful, industrial grade 15 A motor that operates at 4,500 RPM, giving you the ripping power to cut through even the toughest woods. This Hitachi table saw has a 0-45 degree bevel and height adjustments. One of the best features is its large work table which also has a telescoping extension, allowing rip cuts up to 35 in. wide! When you pair the power of this table saw with the bevel range and table size, you’ll be able to power through any project you throw at it! Other great features include: front mounted controls, over sized controls, integrated safety switch, and a soft start function that helps decrease recoil at startup.
Table saws cut more or less the same way as a circular saw (covered in their own report): a round blade, usually 10 inches in diameter, spins as it works its way through the wood. The main difference is that the blade is fixed in place, sticking up through a gap in the table, and the operator moves the wood past the blade instead of moving the saw itself. Table saws support and guide lumber and wood panels as they pass over the spinning blade, making it easier to make accurate repeat cuts than with a circular saw.

More expensive models also have more efficient drivetrains, which means they achieve a higher cutting speed for smoother, faster, and trouble-free cuts. Plus, their innovative belt designs and calibrated trunnion supports make the whole cutting experience smoother, quieter, and simpler. You’ll also pay extra for innovative safety features like skin detection, paddle power switches, magnetic switches, and thermal overload protection. 

The DEWALT DW745 and the Bosch 4100 are pretty evenly matched in having plenty of power and not-so-hot dust collection. I you’re looking for a light weight saw, the DEWALT comes in ahead since it weighs almost half as much as the Bosch. It is also the less expensive choice by far. The large work table, expanded cutting capability, and its Gravity Rise feature (with solid rubber wheels that make it easy to be rolling across rugged terrain at a jobsite) make the Bosch a Cadillac among Pintos, but, of course, that luxury comes with a price tag.


In other words, a malfunction might mean an injury. This distinction could not be more pronounced in any other job site equipment than a table saw. I have personally witnessed devastating injuries on a number of occasions that could have easily been avoided by the use of safety equipment that comes standard on most brand name saws. Liability for a job site injury can be a serious setback for well established companies, but for small, independent contractors it could mean the difference between business and bankruptcy.

rarely have to work with stock that thick. I mostly prefer to do this on my bandsaw any way. The 2" dust port allows me to hook up the shop vac and it does a decent job of getting most of the dust. The saw doesn't have much room in front of the blade so it was impossible to use my shop made cutoff sled. I solved this problem by making my own removable infeed extension table. Now I can use the 22" cutoff sled. After a year and a half the saw is still in adjustment and runs true. The saw stays in my shop and doesn't get bounce around on the back of a pickup truck. Based on my experience I highly recommend this saw if you have a small shop and don't plan on building large pieces
But if you have the space for the DeWalt to sit upright at a work station or deep storage shelf, then it may be the better choice, thanks to its more comfortable adjustment controls. You won't be able to use a dado blade with the DeWalt (at least not safely), and the rip capacity is slightly smaller, but there's a reason why it's been popular for a while now. It's a great saw that delivers reliable performance.

Look for guards with two independent panels on each side of the blade, so that while you work on one side, the other side keeps dust in the vacuum system, rather than flying off to the side. High-end cabinet units also have splitter and guard systems which are molded like the internal shrouding to amplify suction, so you should look carefully at those features.
The most critical safety feature on a table saw is the blade guard. It’s all that separates your fingers from the rapidly rotating blade. You need this to be transparent or it will make measuring awkward. The last thing you want is to be tempted to remove an unfit guard. Check closely for a clear, flexible blade guard. Safety is paramount when operating a table saw.
I definitely give this one 5 stars, but this is specific of the application – it being portable. If I was comparing it with other Hybrid saws, than this one doesn’t really compare when it comes to power. That being said. I was shopping for a table saw, after many years of working with a circular saw, and a straight edge – for me – it was time to get a setup for repetitive cuts that would be easier, and less time consuming (not to mention more precise, as the machine...
Overall, the Dewalt's combination blade leaves a slightly smoother finish, but both brands' general purpose construction blades are good enough to start off with. Cross and rip-cut edges were fairly smooth, but users who plan to cut down a lot of plywood will definitely want to invest in a more suitable saw blade. Both saws provided ample cutting power without a noticeable difference in cutting speeds, so we're calling this one a tie.
There are several types of table saws. The types of jobs or projects you plan to use a table saw for will determine which type you buy. If you want a saw you can take from job site to job site and store it easily, then you will need a table saw that is made to be portable so that it can be easily transported to the job site. Of the portable or work site table saws on the market today, the Bosch 4100-09 10-Inch Worksite Table Saw with Gravity-Rise Stand and the DEWALT DW745 10-Inch Compact Job-Site Table Saw with 16-Inch Max Rip Capacity are two of the most popular.
The blades are categorized according to number of teeth, diameter, arbor size, kerf size, application and speed. They can also be divided by material. Regular commercial table saws are 10-inch or 12-inch. Teeth usually number from 24-80. Many blades are tipped with diamond, carbon or carbide. This lets you cut through more than just wood. You will also need to think about the tilt of the blade. They are available in left tilt or right tilt. With a left-tilting hybrid or cabinet saw, the motor cover can get in the way of the sliding table. Router table extensions don’t work well on left-tilting saws. 
On the downside, these units are by far the heaviest type of saw, and they’re the most expensive by a long shot. Their cast iron worktops and steel cabinets makes them more of a permanent fixture than nearly any other tool. To move them around your shop, you’ll need an expensive, heavy-duty wheeled base, which can cost even more money up front. They’re best for people who will keep them in one place, and use them on a regular basis.
Some previous buyers had motor trouble. Their units conked out early, or worked inconsistently. Apparently, that was down to cheap internal bearings used in the first few iterations of the Bosch. However, according to company replies to some reviewers who cited the issue, the problem has been addressed in the last few versions of this model. We’ve also found that reviews from the past few years are much more consistently positive.
These tests and evaluations are very difficult, take a lot of time, and ultimately limited in scope as we’re not a professional testing company and we’ve got limited time to evaluate the tools. We cannot do longer term testing that would shed light on durability and we can’t possibly test every application that you might use of one of these saws for. However, we feel comfortable that all the table saws in this Head-to-Head are good saws and our testing helps bring to light pros and cons for each saw.
Below we’ve included the current pricing (at the time of publishing this article). Pricing includes the cost of the stand and ranges from a low of $349 for the Hitachi to a high of $1,299 for the SawStop. The lowest price isn’t always the best in our opinion, we’re looking for the best value.  The Hitachi is an incredible deal at $349 and our top pick for price and value for a saw that has lots of power, a rack & pinion fence, and a solid stand.
This is a truly great saw, except that it is really tough to adjust the blade and rip fence for parallel. Once adjusted though, it is a fine piece of engineering. What I like best is that the saw is built for the job site. It is extremely beefy, but no too heavy. In my opinion, it strikes a nice balance. Its cart stand is the best in the industry, bar none. Once adjusted, the saw returns to its settings extremely well. It is obviously built for the long haul, and should last a contractor many years. I would definitely purchase this saw again. Now with the things that I wish were better. First, adjusting the blade for parallel is just plain hard. Mine was out from the factory by 4 thousandths. It is a trial and error process, and the instructions suck. Here's what to do: 1. Loosen the four screws indicated in the instructions. Starting from behind the saw, center the blade housing in the rear left to right as best you can, then tighten one screw not quite snug (you want the housing to rotate on this screw when you adjust the front). Next move to the front of the saw and loosen the lock lever for blade angle adjustment (the housing won't move unless you do). Now, begin experimenting with holding the housing at 90 degrees with one hand while sliding the housing back and forth with the other until square. When you think that you are close, lightly tighten one of the front housing screws. Check for parallel (look for videos on how to check a table saw blade for parallel), then tighten the blade angle adjustment lever. With these screws and the lever tight and locked, check again for parallel. If it is still good (I got it to 1/1000 inch of parallel), then lock all the screws and check one more time, if it's still good, then you are done with blade housing adjustment.
There’s a lot to like about this saw. The stand is easy to set up and very sturdy. We like the smooth-operating table extension and the blade guard’s hold-up feature and ease of installation. The only downside we found is that the motor mount is less rigid than those on the other saws we tested. We suspect that’s why the cut quality on our torture test was not as good with this saw.

There were really two major performance considerations we wanted to look at to help determine the best portable jobsite table saw: cutting power and dust collection. Power is an obvious choice. We want to make clean, straight cuts, but we don’t want to spend all day making them. Any saw can be calibrated to be straight and accurate, but some have to be babied more than others to get professional results.

As power tool nerds, we’re always on the lookout for the latest and greatest developments in the market. One of the most exciting new products to come out in the past decade or so is the hybrid table saw. We think they’re an excellent space and money-saving alternative for home woodworkers who can’t make a cabinet saw work for their circumstances. They’re also a great portable option for folks with bigger job site requirements who have the ability to transport larger tools to off-site applications. One of our current favorites is this Shop Fox:
Electric brakes in the saw is an important feature as helps the saw in reversing electricity in the motor, thus contributing to a precise cut. It is highly recommended that when you are buying a saw choose the one with on and off switch. The switch should be easily accessible to make work better and more efficient. In addition, the switch should have a cover. This will keep you from accidentally turning the saw on and damaging your work area or cutting yourself.
One of the lightest and most compact table saws was also the most stable: Skilsaw. There’s no wheel base to the stand and the outward angled legs provide a wider platform than it may appear against its colleagues. In second place was DeWalt, also offering a wide platform, but without the amount of rigidity that Skilsaw has in their stand. Coming up in third was Bosch with its gravity rise stand followed closely by Ridgid. It’s important to note that none of the professional class table saws had any stability issues inherent to their extension locking—it was all in the stand.
For carpentry projects or as a starter saw, the DeWalt DW745 receives solid reviews. Though it doesn't have the capacity of the Bosch, owners say it's well made and easy to adjust. The rack-and-pinion fence earns kudos for accuracy. The saw weighs just 45 pounds and can even be hung on a workshop wall for storage; an optional is also available. The three-year warranty is another plus.
One important aspect to consider when buying a new table saw or looking for a new blade is axis adjustment. Being able to adjust the vertical height of the blade allows you to control the depth of the cut, it’s also useful when you don’t need to cut all the way through the wood, especially useful with thick pieces of wood. To help making bevel cuts and joints you can adjust the blade to certain angles that you require.
Finding useful reviews on this site is a challenge. A search for "table saw review" turned up a few relevant articles, but they're mixed in with news, tips, and coverage for other types of cutting tools. Most of the actual reviews for table saws are old, and many of the products are discontinued. However, we turned up a few in-depth reviews posted within the past year, as well as a few older reviews for products that are still on the market.
While ordering generic no-name products might be fine for something like breakfast cereal, power tools are different. When you use power tools, your safety is at stake. If you pick up some cheapo piece of mass produced junk just because the price is less than a name brand, you might end up paying a lot higher price for it than you counted on. Why? Because generic power tools are not usually held to the quality control and accuracy as big box brands such as DEWALT and Bosch.
For ideal usage, the on/off switch needs to be mounted on the front of the saw and should be easy to turn off with your knee or a swat without having to look at it to locate it. Most table saw models have a safety feature that is a plastic key that has to be inserted before the table saw can be turned on. Some may even have a way to padlock the switch.

Three professional carpenters test ten portable table saws, including two now discontinued. They outfit them all with Diablo 40-tooth general-purpose blades and test them on both 3/4-inch plywood and pressure-treated 2x pine. Each saw earns points for safety features, fence quality, stability, weight, stand design, ease of adjustment, cutting power, and dust collection. Totaling up these scores determines the saws' overall ranking, as well as their "class ranking" against comparably priced brands. Some additional single product reviews of table saws can be found elsewhere on the site as well.

Even though is seems pretty irrelevant, the position of the On/Off switch is quite important, especially if you’re a frequent user of these tools. In today’s models, the switch is usually leveled with your knees. The main thing you should look for is the size of the OFF switch. It has to be big enough so that you can turn the unit off immediately either with your knees, elbows, or hands. The so-called panic button is one of the crucial elements of every unit, even if it doesn’t seem like it.
While the sheer price of this Bosch unit might be cost-prohibitive for most buyers, we think it’s the full-time professional’s ideal mobile unit. With the REAXX flesh-detection system onboard, it’s one of the safest table saws on the market, portable or stationary. The system detects flesh and stops itself instantly, without leaving a mark on the hot dog test.
It has all the safety features you need. This one has a big, brightly-colored stop button connected to an electric brake, so you can easily bring the blade to a halt. The stop button panel also has a thermal overload switch built in, so it’ll automatically switch the saw off if the motor becomes too hot. We also love that there’s a magnetic switch in the same panel, which prevents the machine from turning itself back on if power cuts out in your shop while you’re working.
When I moved to a new home my shop area was radically downsized to half of a two car garage. In my former shop I had a 10" contractor's table saw for over 30 years. I really loved that saw but knew I was going to have to get a smaller saw. I reluctantly purchased the Bosch 4100-09 10" jobsite saw not expecting much. Wow was I wrong. I've had the saw for about a year and a half and use it daily to build medium to smaller sized projects ( boxes, trays, hanging cabinets, end tables). Right out of the box the saw performed well, I had my doubts about doing fine cabinet and furniture work but it is up to the task. I added the TS1002 outside table which is a necessity for larger boards. I also purchased the TS 1007 dado insert. The saw accommodates my freud 8" dado stack up to 1/2" which is sufficient for me. I use only thin kerf blades with a stabilizer and I've had no trouble ripping up to 1 1/2" hardwood. I do have to take it slower than on my contractor's saw but I
It’s highly portable. Even though the whole body feels sturdier than the Dewalt’s, it’s still relatively light, at just about 60 pounds. There are handles in both the top and bottom edges of the machine, for easy lifting, and once you’ve got the saw fixed to the base, you won’t have to lift it on your own except for when you’re loading it in the back of the truck/van.
Product reviews on this site contain our opinion of a product or service. We will always strive for objectivity and transparency in our reviews. Our goal is to provide readers with honest, objective information based on our own experiences. We never have and never will accept payment in exchange for a positive review. Many of the products that we review are provided to us for free by a manufacturer or retailer. In some cases, we also have advertising or affiliate relationships with manufacturers and retailers of products and services we review. For additional information please visit our additional disclosure policies.
Setup was nearly as simple as SawStop’s with just a narrow margin between them. We only needed to attach the handle and bolt the saw down to the stand. The stand is a gravity rise style, but requires you to bend down to ground level for collapsing and extending it. It’s a reasonably solid platform, though a lot of movement throughout the day will leave your back sore.
One of the things we looked at was the ease of assembly out of the box. We had the same person assemble each of the saws and timed the assembly to see if there are any significant differences between the models. The assembly time for the saws ranged from 21 minutes to 48 minutes. While some stands required more than twice the time, we felt the assembly time was not a significant enough factor to change someone’s mind on which saw to purchase.
That’s why we’ve created this handy guide! As usual, our trusty team have taken a comprehensive look at all the options out there. We’ve looked for portable units that don’t sacrifice power or accuracy for their small size. You’ll find our Top Three recommendations below, along with a few additional choices for new woodworkers and demanding professionals.
It’s often overwhelming when looking for new power tools and products online. So many features, specs and brands etc to research and review. So, what should you look for when buying a new table saw? One thing we always mention is to make sure you read as many table saw reviews as you can before purchasing one, this will insure you have the best table saw for your requirements.
The blades are categorized according to number of teeth, diameter, arbor size, kerf size, application and speed. They can also be divided by material. Regular commercial table saws are 10-inch or 12-inch. Teeth usually number from 24-80. Many blades are tipped with diamond, carbon or carbide. This lets you cut through more than just wood. You will also need to think about the tilt of the blade. They are available in left tilt or right tilt. With a left-tilting hybrid or cabinet saw, the motor cover can get in the way of the sliding table. Router table extensions don’t work well on left-tilting saws. 
You’ll make most of your miter cuts on a miter saw. But when the material you’re cutting exceeds a miter saw’s cross-cutting capacity, you turn to your table saw miter gauge. These usually aren’t quite as precise, but some manufacturers put more thought and robustness into it than others. If you make a lot of long miter cuts, be sure to pay attention to this accessory.

If you want to increase your safety, get a saw that has a flesh sensor. Doing so though will increase the price quite a bit, so only get it if you can afford it or care very much about your safety. A flesh sensor will stop the saw in as little as 0.01s after it comes in contact with your skin. While the blade will be damaged beyond repair, you’ll be safe.Now that you know a bit more about the factors to consider when getting a cabinet table saw, let’s take a better look below at some of the best models you can currently buy.

Belt drive table saw motors run on a pulley system, most of the time some power is lost through this system, but belt drive blades can cut through thicker timber and hardwoods. They can produce power of around 3 to 5HP and thanks to the motor being mounted further away from the blade with belt drive, the motor will last longer as less dust will get into the motor. One thing to consider though is that belt drive will be in general more expensive and are normally found on heavy cabinet type saws, so this must be considered when working out your budget.
The Grizzly G0690 is a very unique and powerful table saw and each part of it says performance and quality. With a 3 HP, 220V, 3-phase Leeson motor, heavy cast iron trunnions, wings and table to its triple belt drive system, this model should definitely last you for a lifetime. It’s not only its impressive build quality that’s going to strike you about it, but also its other features that include a four inch dust collection port, a T-slot miter gauge, a magnetic switch, but also heavy cat hand-wheels, riving knife and camlock T-fence. If you’re a professional who’s been using cabinet tablet saws for a quite a while, you’ll immediately appreciate the quality of the Grizzly G0690.
By the late 18th century, a new tool had been created that would eventually have the sawyers out of work: the circular saw. These early rotating saws were powered by a range of different forces, often including running water or wind, and sometimes driven by animal power. By the early 1800s, the sawmill was replacing the saw pit and its hardworking manual sawyers.
Skilsaw produced the only worm drive table saw in our group and we had high expectations, especially given the high RPM count. In the end, the power is definitely at the professional level and settled in tied for fourth overall with DeWalt. This was the lightest, most compact saw in the group. Like DeWalt, the lack of an outer housing leads to more efficient cooling but drops storage for an extra blade.
Compared to some of the other miter saws we’ve used – predating the new riving knife requirement, the Bosch GTS1031 guard system is much easier to install and remove when necessary (and to put the saw back into portable mode). We timed ourselves and assembled and tore down the saw in just over 2 minutes – and we were confident that our time would get better with more practice. The table is made of machined cast aluminum and is texture-coated to make it fairly slick – something that really helped when cutting larger pieces of 3/4″ plywood for a workbench surface. As for extending the table – that was super-easy. You just lift the table extension handle upwards and slide the table to the right. This gives you a full 18″ of rip width to the rip fence with your material to the right of the blade. Collapsed, you get up to 10″. Motion of the rip fence and the table extension were smooth. While the fence had some wobble in it at the far end – this completely disappeared when you locked it down – and the shape of the rear of the fence locked it straight every time. It’s a good system and more than adequate for a low-cost portable saw like this. We’ve seen more robust fence systems. But typically the trade-off has been in weight as well as cost.
The only dislike that I have found about the Bosch 4100-09’s operation is that unlocking the table causes a tab to pop up above the cutting surface. This tab interferes with the operation of the fence, and could lead to damage of the product. It also comes with only a one year warranty. It does have available rear out-feed extensions available, to help facilitate larger work pieces.
Powerful cutting and portable convenience with the Delta Powerful cutting and portable convenience with the Delta 36-6022. The 1-step release stand and large wheels make it easy to move the saw to any jobsite. The 15 Amp commercial grade motor cuts through the toughest materials. UL approved 3-way guarding system with riving knife for safety and excellent dust ...  More + Product Details Close
The larger the motor, the higher the voltage as well, usually 240V. In some cases, you may be lucky and have a garage or workshop that’s wired for 240V, so that is why it’s very important that you check this prior to getting the table saw. In terms of the material thickness it can handle, it’s a minimum of three inches. One thing to bear in mind is that safety is an essential consideration with these saws and that’s because the powerful motors are prone to higher kickback.

Reviewers recommend these models for easy transport to jobsites and for easy storage in a small workshop. Portable table saws come in two types. Benchtop saws sit on top of a workbench and are light enough to pick up and carry; jobsite saws are mounted on folding stands, usually with wheels for easier transport. The main drawbacks of a portable saw are its lower power and smaller table, which makes it tricky to cut larger lumber and sheet material such as plywood. Prices for portable saws start at less than $200, but the best-rated models typically cost $300 or more.
If you want to increase your safety, get a saw that has a flesh sensor. Doing so though will increase the price quite a bit, so only get it if you can afford it or care very much about your safety. A flesh sensor will stop the saw in as little as 0.01s after it comes in contact with your skin. While the blade will be damaged beyond repair, you’ll be safe.Now that you know a bit more about the factors to consider when getting a cabinet table saw, let’s take a better look below at some of the best models you can currently buy.
More power is also associated with more control. More control also gives you the ability to cut tougher materials. Furthermore, more control allows you to use bigger blades with ease. For instance, a 1500W of the motor will result in swift movement of the blade as it spins. High RPM of the blade gives the user a greater chance of achieving accurate and precise cut. So, when shopping for a table saw, look out for a skill saw with the higher motor rating.
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