One of the biggest perks of a cabinet table saw, aside from the rugged construction and wide worktop, is the sheer power of the tool. You should expect a cabinet table saw to cut absolutely any stock within its depth capacity smoothly and easily. Look for motors with at least 3 HP, and sophisticated belt drive systems which translate that grunt into 4000+ RPM blade speeds. Don’t accept lesser power ratings on a cabinet model: these are the gold standard of table saws for a reason!
Move the wood to and then "through" the spinning saw blade slowly and steadily. It's alright to use your hands while you're still at least a foot or so from the blade, but once the end of the board or sheet nears the blade, you should use a pushing stick to keep the wood moving and to keep your fingers away from the blade. Even an experienced carpenter can have a lapse in concentration or a slip that can lead to serious injury.
Cabinet table saws are the best choice for full-time professional woodworkers with a dedicated workshop. If you have a spacious shop, these are some of the most efficient, versatile cutting tools you can buy, especially for larger stock. With 3+ HP motors, they’re by far the most powerful machines you can get your hands on. Plus, their heavy, machined build quality gives you a precision and smoothness in your work that really compliments the professional. They have the most effective dust collection systems of any table saw, and durability that can last more than a lifetime.

Dewalt has refined the DW745's design, most notably improving the blade guard and safety measures. What stands out about the DW745 is its rack-and-pinion rip fence that moves along telescoping rails at the front and rear of the table. This means that once the fence is set square, it should stay square. However, the DeWalt's maximum width for a rip cut is 16 inches, compared to 18 inches for the Bosch. But most users will make large rip cuts with a circular saw, so the 2-inch difference in capacity isn't a big deal.
There were really two major performance considerations we wanted to look at to help determine the best portable jobsite table saw: cutting power and dust collection. Power is an obvious choice. We want to make clean, straight cuts, but we don’t want to spend all day making them. Any saw can be calibrated to be straight and accurate, but some have to be babied more than others to get professional results.
Cabinet table saws are the best choice for full-time professional woodworkers with a dedicated workshop. If you have a spacious shop, these are some of the most efficient, versatile cutting tools you can buy, especially for larger stock. With 3+ HP motors, they’re by far the most powerful machines you can get your hands on. Plus, their heavy, machined build quality gives you a precision and smoothness in your work that really compliments the professional. They have the most effective dust collection systems of any table saw, and durability that can last more than a lifetime.

TBB used the same iGauging 35-125-4 digital dial indicator to measure the accuracy of the as-delivered factory fence to the table miter slot. We started by placing the fence in a locked position about 1” away from the blade on the opposite side from the miter slot. We adjusted the throw of the dial indicator so that we took the readings on the indicator, as before, in the middle of the indicator’s range of movement.

I never – not even with a big cabinet saw – enjoyed cutting down full sheets, and that isn’t going to change anytime soon. So, for me, the bigger capacity of the big saws isn’t as attractive as just cutting down the sheets with a track saw. Suddenly, with a track saw and a quality saw the size of the 4100, I can achieve the same results in a smaller footprint, for less money, more safely (I consider a track saw safer than manhandling full sheets alone)


You have to know the amount of money you are willing to spend for the right saw. The truth is that the price will vary significantly depending on where you are buying the saw, the brand and the features it comes with. However, with a good budget, you can easily narrow down the options you may have. You will have a smaller range to work with and you will know what features to expect within that price range. Always be willing to spend a little more on the table saw you want in your workshop especially if you work on wood every day.

PLEASE EXCUSE THE PICTURE, LUMBER JOCKS REQUIRED ONE. I AM AWAY FROM HOME AND COULDN’t RUN OUT TO THE GARAGE TO SNAP A SHOT. I am writing a review of my Bosch saw after a few months of use. I bought this saw last November after my Ryobi saw up and died during a project. I looked at several saws in the $600-$800 range and narrowed it down to four options. The Bosch and DeWalt jobsite saws, and the Delta and Ridgid contractor saws. My requirements were in a realativly compact saw th...


The whole thing is a bit more versatile than the Dewalt, thanks to expanded fence rails and an extended trunnion set. It has a wider rip capacity than the Dewalt. This one uses a traditional sliding-rail fence which gives you a rip capacity up to 25 inches. The fence locks at either side, like the Dewalt’s. It also has a wider bevel range, tilting up to 47 degrees.
I’m trying to replace some lost tools for a doctor inflicted, lawyer cowardice sustained injury. I’ve been a woodworker for more years than I might imagine I am comfortable with saying simply for it seems to have been bestowed upon me from birth. The only comment I have is a general comment. As I’ve noticed from about 20 years ago being introduced do officially being educated at a local community college, everyone there had prestige rights attached to it, a couple of cabinet makers I worked for did also that Porter Cable was the Cadilac of woodworking tools. Well, China… Read more »
Speaking of safety, this particular model offers a satisfactory level of it. First of all, the tool-free adjustments come in handy if you’re in a middle of a project. In case you need to make a quick adjustment, you don’t have to stop whatever you’re doing and commit your attention to fine-tuning. Instead, you can do it on the go, without any additional tools. Furthermore, the convenient guarding system keeps your fingers and hands safe at all times. Don’t forget to wear protective gear; it can make a difference between life and death.
Setting up or taking down Craftsman’s spring-assisted stand is a six-step process, involving various release latches. It’s not intuitive like that of Bosch or RIDGID. And, once the stand is folded down, don’t lift the handles up too far when rolling the saw around, or the stand drags against the floor. A shorter woodworker might find this less of a problem than this 6′ 3″ tester did. I also found that the stand’s narrow stance and light weight couldn’t prevent it from skittering on the floor as I pushed heavy lumber across the top. A word to the wise: weigh the base down for heavy-duty work or for cutting large sheet goods.
With both saws offering easy bevel and blade height adjustment, the ease of use comparison focuses mainly on the rip fences. Once the Bosch's rip fence is attached to the table, it moves smoothly across the table when unlocked. But unlocking the fence requires a bit of hand muscle. You can adjust the clamping pressure to alleviate this, but make it too loose and the fence may wobble out of square. Modifying the fence locking lever, or using a cheater bar (such as a push stick) works reasonably well. 

Besides that, materials are expensive, and when you ruin even a couple of pricey work pieces with a saw that doesn’t provide accurate cut you will end up paying far more for that cheap saw than you anticipated. Having a good saw that you can depend on for accuracy and efficiency is a solid business move for any contractor. Both the DW745 and the Bosch 4100 have a true riving knife, anti-kickback pawls, and a blade guard to prevent kickback and possible injury.
We don’t always post the point totals when we do a shootout like this because it gets complicated – you have to decide what the important features and performance categories are, determine how much weight each one should hold, and then actually hash out the scores with the team. That said, some of these table saws scored so close to each other that I didn’t feel it was fair to just leave it up to the rankings.
Our top midrange choice comes from Jet, which is a partner brand of the well-known Powermate lineup. This unit is a good choice for folks who need a saw that can cut through absolutely anything, at a reasonable price, and without taking up too much space. It’s more compact than the Grizzly, but it offers even faster saw speeds and more precise adjustments. We recommend it to folks who want lots of power, but don’t have the room for a larger cabinet unit.
If you need to move your saw around, it comes with a table saw stand that you can put up and down with ease. Fashioned from aluminum pipes with wheels that can handle uneven terrain, move around site without breaking your back. As well as its user-friendly nature, the stand can be stored away vertically so it’s a real space-saver whether at home or on the jobsite.

As for extensions, I have added the TS1002 and TS1003 outfeeds (rear and left side respectively) – They do a great job supporting the workpieces without making the saw the least bit tippy. For my use, I don’t get much use from the left side support, but the rear outfeed is great. Much nicer than setting up an outfeed stand and trying to dial it in.

Welcome to the heart of this website – my selection of the best table saws for several specific needs. You see, it’s impossible to select only ONE as the best for all purposes because a table saw should be carefully tailored to your needs. There’s no point in buying a complex cabinet saw if you’re a beginner, you’re probably better off with a solid benchtop saw. The same goes if you’re a professional, only the other way around.
We took all of the data from the RPM and AMP measurements and added them to come up with the final performance rankings. For each saw we added up the total percentage decrease in RPM’s (for each material type) and added that to the total percentage increase in AMP’s (for each material type). This gives us a relative comparison of each saw over all 6 sets of data.

The bench table saw is the least expensive of the four types of saws. Some models come with a folding stand that is on wheels which makes it very easy to move or reposition without having to lift it all the time. Even though it is relatively light, constant lifting can become tiresome. You can mount these on your workbench which will give it more stability and could possibly reduce the amount of vibration as well. These smaller table saws generally have a 1 hp motor or even smaller and can run on a normal household circuit with no issues.
The DeWalt will do you proud for a broad spread of applications. If you’re a home woodworker, you’ll be able to rip sheet material, size material as thick as 3 inches, frame lumber and make cross cuts to your heart’s content. For professionals, the DeWalt is perfect for trim carpentry, installation of hardwood floors, decking or remodeling. There’s very little you can’t do with this beast.
The design is not bad. The height of this particular table saw is around 35 inches. While some people don’t mind it, we think it could have been designed better. However, the best thing about the design is the fact that you can get both contractor and cabinet style table saws in one unit. Dust control is well-designed. The large 4-inch dust port offers a no-hassle setup, especially with vacuums of lower quality. In simpler words, you don’t need to purchase a super-expensive vacuum for this particular unit; any affordable one should do the job well.
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